Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Hero Hunter: Who's Hiring, Who's the target?

After reading through my previous tables for jobs for my upcoming Hero Hunters game, I was left somewhat unsatisfied with who the employers were, and information on the targets. So, I decided to go into a bit more detail with these groups. The tables below are meant to augment the previous ones—so, for example, if I already know that the person hiring the PC’s is a criminal group, I wouldn't roll for that.

City: Generally picked in advance, based on famous or iconic cities. Though “location” of the job can very this quite a bit.

Law Rating: what the city can throw at the players, from dealing with paperwork to cops coming after them

1
Non-existent or barely there. This is either due to crime being almost unheard of (perhaps thanks to heroes) or the local authorities being utterly overwhelmed/underfunded
2
Sufficient for most day-to-day situations
3
Full police, capable of investigating and prosecuting even exceptional cases, if not necessarily stop them.
4
Like 3, but the addition of SWAT or similar teams allow for active engagement with even meta-human crimes.
5
Like 4, but with EITHER appointed “Super-Cops” (1-3) or a SCRET, or similar team (4-6).
6
Like 4, but with both Super-Cops AND full SCRET.
Factions: 1d3. Any city of significant size will attract some amount of meta-human attention.

Relationship to government: how the faction and the locals get along.
1
Hunted—the local authorities assume the group to be criminals or terrorists and are actively hunting them. They are effectively at war with each other.
2
Unknown—local authorities have had no reason to look at this group
3
Faceless—just another typical group of its nature; while they’ve had dealings with the authorities, nothing unusual or untoward has happened.
4
Working relationship—either through fame and good works or corruption and bribery, the local authorities and the faction have worked out a way to co-exist.
5
Dominance—heroes are so trusted as to effectively “outrank” all but most senior or local authorities, while criminals have co-opted them.
6
Rulership—it might not be public, but this faction effectively runs the town.
Faction Alignment
2
Principled
3
Scrupulous
4
Unprincipled
5
Anarchist
6
Aberrant
7
Miscreant
8
Diabolic
Public face: what most people think they’re up to
1
Criminal
2
Corporate
3
Government
4
Charitable Organization
5
Religious Organization
6
“Secret” Society
7
Terrorists
8
Crime-Fighters
Private Face: what they’re actually up to. If it matches the public face, then that’s what it is, or it’s more extreme. For example, the cops might think they’re dealing with “criminals” who are running “massage parlors” unaware that these are fronts for a major prostitutions/slavery ring.
1
Criminal-Mercenary
2
Criminal-Super-Fence
3
Same as Public
4
Crimelord
5
Criminal-Scientific
6
Criminal-Drug Syndicate
7
Corporate
8
Heroes
9
Cult
10
World conquest
11
Government--Intelligence
12
Government--Military
Scope
2-3
Local
4-5
National
6-7
Regional
8
Global
Type
1
Mundane
2
Experiment
3
Robotics
4
Bionics & Implants
5
Special Training
6
Mutants
7
Psionics
8
Physical Training
9
Magic
10
Hardware
11
Aliens
12
Roll twice & Combine OR Mega
Generally speaking, most members of the organization won’t be full “PC” level Types. For example, if I get “Physical Training” (which, in Heroes Unlimited is reserved for Batmanesque heroes), then most members will be highly trained “Ninja’s”—well trained with HTH: Martial Arts, but only key leaders and champions being PC level. A Hardware or Bionics group will mainly consist or researchers, engineers, administrators and the like. Similarly, most members of a “Mutant” group will have a handful of Unusual Characteristics and maybe one or two minor super powers.

My general rule of thumb with NPC’s is to make them only as powerful as they NEED to be, but not to min/max them. A group of villainous super-scientists NEED a lot of science skills and maybe ray-guns. They don’t all need Power Armor.

Monday, December 9, 2013

Hero Hunters: Getting Work

So, now that I've worked out how I want the players to behave and how that affects the kinds of jobs they can get, I want to spend a bit of time thinking about how they actually go about getting those jobs, and what those jobs entail.

If only it were that easy


First off, there are a few different ways word of various jobs end up making their way to the players.

Open Bounties--various governments, crime syndicates, and other groups will just publicly announce they want something done, and the reward for this. Generally these are to either kill or capture an individual or a group, and payment is provided upon completion. How “public” these actually are varies, naturally--it’s not like the Mafia is going to put out flyers or anything, but anyone with any degree of contacts or remotely “plugged in” will know about these. There will almost always be rivals for the job, and the target almost always is aware of the danger they are under.

Direct Contact--the players are approached directly by a group that needs something done, generally either friends or direct relation (for example, they have a cousin who is a Made Man in the mob, or who works for DoD), or using those same relations as middle men (the Russian Mob might approach a friend in the Italian Mob who contacts the players).  Can be almost any kind of job.

Dark Web--the game will take place in the mid-90’s, and the Internet is still a wondrous and imposing thing.  Hidden deep behind “firewalls” and “mainframes” lurks the “Dark Web” a practically unknown and unpoliced location, where Villains and criminals of all stripes can conduct business in anonymity.

Brokers--the most legitimate and often the best paying gigs out there. They are generally limited to those with Rep’s of C or higher.  These are actual companies who take contracts from governments and corporations (even if these are often fronts for criminal or intelligence groups), and farm them out to various “independent contractors.”  You will be expected to keep your nose relatively clean, and pay taxes, fees, and what not from money earned.  Amsterdam and Hong Kong are the homes of the Independent Contractor world, and as such they are considered “safe cities.”

Next, I want to work up some random tables for various jobs. I love randomness in games, it helps keep me on my toes, and can be a wonderful tool for inspiration when I have nothing else to go on.  

Job (1d12)
  1. Assassination
  2. Assault
  3. Kidnapping
  4. Extraction
  5. Robbery
  6. Diversion
  7. Retainer
  8. Courier/Smuggling
  9. Military--Raid
  10. Military--Campaign
  11. Body Guard
  12. Defense

Employer (1d10)
  1. Crime Syndicate
  2. Private (1-2 Upper Class, 3-4 Middle Class, 5-6 Lower Class)
  3. Criminal Gang
  4. Major Corporation
  5. Medium Corporation
  6. Government (home)
  7. Government (foreign)
  8. Supervillain
  9. Aliens
  10. Terrorists

Target/Opposition (1d8)
  1. Major Corporation
  2. Medium Corporation
  3. Government
  4. Supervillain
  5. Superhero
  6. Criminal
  7. Private (1-2 Upper Class, 3-4 Middle Class, 5-6 Lower Class)
  8. Terrorists

Complications (1d8)
  1. Weather
  2. Authorities
  3. Other Villains
  4. Heroes
  5. Innocents
  6. Personal Issues
  7. Screwjob
  8. Unusual or bizarre opposition

Location (1d20)

  1. War Zone
  2. Foreign Country
  3. Skyscraper
  4. Secure Government Facility
  5. Prison
  6. Boat
  7. Jungle
  8. Underground
  9. Underwater
  10. Suburbs
  11. Aerial
  12. Frozen Waste
  13. Alien
  14. Rural
  15. Urban
  16. Industrial Facility
  17. Bank
  18. Private home
  19. Religious
  20. Public location/event

Payment (1d4)
  1. Prior Payment
  2. Advance/Completion
  3. Intermediary
  4. Payment on Completion

MoMj: The Corruption Saga - Session 12

Deirik, Eirik, Ygvard, and Boldulf finally return to Alucard after raiding the East coast of the Sea of Pelluria with loot and casks of Fugu...